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Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry

Princess Patricia's Canadian
Light Infantry (Re-enacted)


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Those Who Served

This is a collection of photos / information of those who served with the Regiment during the First World War.

Major Hamilton "Hammie" Gualt George Harry Mullin (VC, MM) Robert Spall (VC) Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Farquhar, DSO
Major Hamilton "Hammie" Gault - The founder of the Regiment George Harry Mullin (VC, MM) - Further information found in the "Victoria Cross Recipients" section below. Robert Spall (VC) - Further information found in the "Victoria Cross Recipients" section below. The Regiment's first Commanding Officer - Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Farquhar, DSO, was an officer with the Coldstream Guards and Military Secretary to Canada's Governor General, His Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught.
Capt. James Stuart Allen Sgt. E. Douglas Aylen Sgt. Robert Henry Organ
Capt. James Stuart Allen - He became the director of Military Training. Sgt. E. Douglas Aylen # 475337 Sgt. Robert Henry Organ #475980 1915

If you have any photos and / or information about a relative or a friend's relative that served with the PPCLI from 1914-1919 and would like to add them to this page, please email us or contact us by mail: The CMHS, 99 Terrace Ave., Welland, Ontario L3C 6K1 Canada. Any type of archival documents, photos or other information would be greatly appreciated.

The Victoria Cross

The Victoria Cross

The Victoria Cross is the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

The VC was instituted by Royal Warrant in 1856 but was made retrospective to the Autumn of 1854 to cover the period of the Crimean War. It can only be bestowed for actions "in the presence of the enemy" (although from 1858 to 1881 an amendment allowed for awards "under circumstances of extreme danger". Six awards were made under these conditions).

Canada instituted its own Honours and Awards in 1993 and the VC remained the highest award. However, the motto FOR VALOR was changed to the latin PRO VALORE although the Canadian Victoria Cross still needs full royal assent from the Queen to be awarded. No new Canadian VCs have yet been awarded.

George Harry Mullin (VC, MM)

George Harry Mullin (VC, MM)

He was 25 years old, and a Sergeant in the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, Canadian Expeditionary Force during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 30 October 1917 at Passchendaele, Belgium, Sergeant Mullin single-handed captured a pill-box which had withstood heavy bombardment and was causing heavy casualties and holding up the attack. He rushed the snipers' post in front, destroyed the garrison with bombs, shot two gunners and then compelled the remaining 10 men to surrender. All the time rapid fire was directed on him and his clothes were riddled with bullets, but he never faltered in his purpose and he not only helped to save the situation but indirectly saved many lives.

Although born in Portland, Oregon, Mullin is also considered Canadian. His parents brought him to Moosomin, Saskatchewan at age two.

After the war, Mullin joined the militia and achieved the rank of Major.

Buried at Moosomin South Side Cemetery, Moosomin, Saskatchewan, Canada. Legion Plot. Headstone.

His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Museum of the Regiments (Calgary, Alberta, Canada).

Robert Spall (VC)

Robert Spall (VC)

He was 28 years-old, and a Sergeant in the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, Canadian Expeditionary Force during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 13 August 1918 near Parvillers, France, during an enemy counter-attack, Sergeant Spall's platoon became isolated, whereupon he took a Lewis gun and standing on the parapet, fired upon the advancing enemy, inflicting many casualties. He then came down from the trench and directed his men into a sap 75 yards away, after which he picked up another Lewis gun, again climbed the parapet and held up the enemy with his fire, but while doing so was killed. Owing to Sergeant Spall, who deliberately gave his life, the platoon was saved.

His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Museum of the Regiments (Calgary, Alberta, Canada).

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